Massage with Roger Cloutier, LMP

When I approach my clients at the beginning of a massage session, I connect to them in the present moment, as if looking at them for the first time. "Starting over" each time opens up many possibilities and enables me to sense the best approach for that particular session. To learn more about the different types of massage I include in my practice, click the links below.

Traditional Swedish Massage

Deep Tissue Massage

Triggerpoint Therapy

Relaxation Massage

Injury Treatment

Chair Massage

Traditional Swedish Massage

Swedish massage was developed in the 1700's by a Swedish doctor. Swedish massage has long been thought of as the first organized and systematic method of modern massage therapy in the Western world. The specific strokes and manipulations of Swedish massage are each conceived of as having specific therapeutic benefits. The goal of Swedish massage is to speed the venous return of un-oxygenated blood and toxins from the extremities. Swedish massage shortens recovery time from muscular strain without increasing heart load. It stretches the ligaments and tendons, keeping them supple and pliable. Swedish massage also stimulates the skin and nervous system and soothes the nerves themselves at the same time. It reduces stress, both emotional and physical, and is suggested in a regular program for stress management. It also has many specific medical applications.

Swedish massage includes long strokes, kneading, friction, tapping, and shaking motions. It is effective for most ailments, because massaging the skin, the body's largest organ, sets up a chain reaction that produces a positive effect on all layers and systems of the body. It affects the nerves, muscles, glands, and circulation, while promoting health and well being.

Swedish massage refers to a collection of techniques designed primarily to relax muscles by applying pressure to them against deeper muscles and bones and rubbing in the same direction as the flow of blood returning to the heart. The lymph system and veins (which carry blood back to the heart) both rely on muscle action, rather than on heart pressure. (Many believe it is also safe to apply light pressure in the opposite direction.) Swedish massage can relax muscles, increase circulation, remove metabolic waste products, and help recipients gain a feeling of connectedness and a better awareness of their body and the ways in which they use and position it.

A one hour session is $60, a one and a half hour session is $80.

Deep Tissue Massage

Deep tissue massage releases chronic patterns of muscular tension using slow strokes, direct pressure, and friction, usually on a focused problem area. Often the movements are directed across the grain of the muscles (cross-fiber) using the fingers, thumbs, or elbows. This type of massage uses more pressure and is applied to deeper layers of the muscle than Swedish massage.

Deep tissue massage employs the principles of muscular restoration. It works across the muscles, manipulating deep tissues, stimulating circulation, and regenerating lymphatic flow. This promotes detoxification and oxygenation of stagnant tissues. This kind of massage brings fluids into the cells, stimulating changes on a cellular level, Deep tissue massage relieves entrapment of nerves, and it aids in moving out toxins and congestion that may have accumulated in damaged muscles and soft tissue, thereby reducing edema and inflammation, as well as pain. It also softens hard, fibrous muscle that restricts joint range of motion, thereby "throwing off" the body's proper structural alignment.

Finally, deep tissue massage is used in sports massage, and it provides a form of passive exercise for people who have been injured or ill. Combining deep tissue massage with traditional treatments of diseases offers an added edge that can speed recovery and promote maximum improvement where traditional treatments leave off.

A one hour session is $60, a one and a half hour session is $80.

Triggerpoint Therapy

Triggerpoint therapy uses sustained, deep pressure at tender knotted points, which are called "triggerpoints." Many times, these points are connected to other areas on the body where there is pain. These are known as "referral points." Properly applied sustained pressure on the trigger points often results in a "release," which makes the patient feel wonderfully relaxed.

A one hour session is $60, a one and a half hour session is $80.

Relaxation Massage

Relaxation massage combines a variety of techniques that are focused on the body's soft tissues and are applied in a full-body sequence. It is an effective way to reduce tension and stress. It can also have a positive influence on all of the body's systems, from enhancing circulation to allowing increased mobility of the joints. Relaxation massage is much like Swedish massage, although it is not so focused on the blood and lymph fluid moving back to the heart as it is on relaxing. Relaxation massage eases stress from the body by calming the nervous system, reducing muscular tension, and stimulating the release of endorphins (a natural chemical in the body that induces deep relaxation). With stress under control, the body's immune system also functions better.

A one hour session is $60, a one and a half hour session is $80.

Injury Treatment

Injury treatment massage shortens your healing time and helps to return your body to the state it was in before the injury. This type of treatment is effective for injuries due to accidents, sports, or even chronic problems such as carpal tunnel, tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, and tendonitis. Techniques include Swedish massage, deep tissue massage, myotherapy, pin and stretch, and trigger point therapy.

A one hour session is $60, a one and a half hour session is $80.

Chair Massage

Chair Massage is a brief bodywork session, usually acupressure-based, done in a special chair in which you sit "backwards," facing toward the cushions, exposing the scalp, shoulders, neck, arms, back, and hips. Sessions may last between five and thirty minutes.

This style of bodywork was originally pioneered as "on-site massage" for the workplace by David Palmer, who developed the first specialized massage chair in 1986. Since then chair massage has expanded into storefronts, health food stores, airports, airplanes, health fairs, convention centers, sporting events, and other locations.

Because clients remain fully clothed and a session takes less time (and money!) than full table massage, it has become a popular way to learn about the benefits of professional massage.

A twenty minute session is $25, and a half hour session is $35.